Mautic 3 Proposed Timeline

The next major topic everyone is very interested in relating to Mautic 3 is the proposed timeline for when things will be worked on…and maybe more importantly when they’ll be available to user. I totally understand this desire and want to do my best to answer this question but I truly hope that everyone understands this is not a black-and-white topic and something that can be easily answered. Why? I’ll answer that quickly and with two words: because developers. I say that in jest but the reality is not too far off from that joke.

In an open source community the release of new versions of Mautic are completely and totally reliant on the time and attention of the volunteers in the community. This is a massive strength for us because we have such a large number of volunteers, but can quickly become an Achilles’ heel when it comes to timeframes. Volunteer work as they are able to. This means while I will propose a series of steps below for the Mautic 3 timeline I will not attach highly specific deadlines or timeframe (at this stage). Continue reading Mautic 3 Proposed Timeline

Mautic Release Strategy 2018

The Mautic community has a history of various release schedules and timings as we’ve sought to find the best strategy that works for our devs and our users. This tends to be one of the biggest ongoing challenges facing software projects everywhere regardless of the size. We don’t want to create a strategy that is too intensive for the users to maintain and stay current. We don’t want to stuff too much into a single release and hurt our testing strategies or sacrifice our QA process. And on the other end of the spectrum no one wants to wait for years for a release.

This constant back and forth struggle will more than likely continue and I don’t anticipate that we will solve it here today. But I want to share what I believe is the best release strategy for Mautic today. Continue reading Mautic Release Strategy 2018

Looking Ahead to Mautic 3

Mautic 1.0 was released out of beta on March 10, 2015. Then Mautic 2.0 was officially released on July 5, 2016. And that’s where we have continued to make improvements. This means we have been improving and iterating within the 2.x release for almost 2 years. This holds both positive and negative connotations. I’ll start with the positive.

This duration of a major release demonstrates the significant improvement to overall platform stability we have seen. It also speaks to the flexibility of the existing platform to be improved and built on top of, without major breaking changes needing to be introduced.

But there are also negatives resulting from a lengthy release cycle like this. We’re building software for the internet, the rate of change of software on the internet is growing exponentially; the technology is changing; and the landscape is shifting — drastically. By remaining in a single major version we limit the ability to take advantage of those technological advances (if we are unable to make those changes without breaking backwards compatibility).

I’ve discussed the versioning for Mautic previously, if you want to review that information but the tl;dr is we use semantic versioning.

For these reasons the time has come to begin exploring the benefits (and potential downsides) to beginning development of a new Mautic 3.0 release.

Continue reading Looking Ahead to Mautic 3

Saelos Sunday Update

Well this is an exciting update to share. Saelos was announced and released on April 15. Today is April 29, exactly 2 weeks later. Because everyone is busy I’m sure you haven’t been able to keep up with the progress the same way that I have been so I figured the best thing to do is to write a short update post to give you a sort of a status update on how things have been progressing.

This is of course very early beta software (some would even call it alpha, simply due to its newness) but the status of the code causes me to suggest that we have moved much quicker into beta software status. Continue reading Saelos Sunday Update

The MIRROR 2017

Well recently I wrote about my New Year’s Resolutions and I admit my post was a bit of tongue-in-cheek and felt it only fair to share something with a bit more substance. I figured the best way to do this was to share something meaningful which I spent a significant amount of time writing. This was meant for internal use only but in the interest of openness and transparency I’m going to share with the community.

Continue reading The MIRROR 2017

Global Marketing Automation

When we talk about global marketing automation and the need for a product which can meet the diverse needs of a world market one of the first priorities becomes languages. I’ve written about this before but recent news has made this a good time to revisit the topic. More often than not people tend to forget that there are other languages spoken in the world. It’s just human nature to become comfortable and focus on your local environment. This is especially noticeable in the Western world (aka the United States). But this is close-minded and a narrow focus on the task to accomplish.

Marketing automation has traditionally been one of the largest offenders of this narrow view of the world. Case in point: some of the most well-known existing marketing software companies are proud (and actually brag) on the fact they provide their software in 5 languages. Five.

Mautic is an open source marketing automation platform where the focus from the very first day has been on a global environment and the vision for a product available to everyone in every language. This community-first approach has lead to some incredible milestones being reached at insane speeds. How incredible? Let’s look at some numbers.

More than 253 collaborators have joined the Mautic translations team. Together these engaged volunteers have actively been translating Mautic into 24 languages. With more than 47 languages started. That’s amazing! (24 languages is 500% more translated than the other marketing platforms.) And the Mautic community has accomplished this in under 10 months. That’s not a typo; in less than a year this community has come together and built a robust platform available in a way unlike anything before. Local and familiar.

But this is not the end of the story. Even Mautic has a long way to go. Our community has some great momentum but this is not the time to sit back and relax. Because this is the bigger picture:

“There are roughly 6,500 spoken languages in the world today.” (Source)

And so, even though Mautic dominates the marketing landscape there are still thousands of languages yet to go. And as we have done so far we will continue to do, pressing on, empowering people around the world to use cutting edge marketing software in their native language. Because that’s what open source and community means. This is the power of our community and this is the power of Mautic.

A Better RedHat Model to Replicate Today

If you look at what made RedHat successful you will find a unique story. Unique in a variety of ways. First, the marketplace was dominated with closed source box software and lacked any open source freely available products. The dominant players sold licenses of a single software version. Secondly, the notion of free software but paid support was practically unheard of. Again, the dominant players would offer a paid product with free support. RedHat offered a reverse on this model. Many people are aware of this part of the story. Many understand the implications of free software and paid support and how enticing this proposition was. It is easy to see how this caused the global market to shift. Free software regardless of the support is a powerful motivator for someone to begin using a product.

But this is where the majority of people think the RedHat business model ends. This is the point at which many new companies attempt to mimic the supposed “RedHat Model”. And this is the fallacy. Because this is not the complete RedHat model. Look deeper and you find a much more detailed strategy which helped to make RedHat successful. Even still what follows may not be a complete picture but should provide at least a slightly more detailed view of the story.

Though the “free software and paid support” model does play a role in the overall strategy there are many more levels of opportunity present. This is the key to a modern day RedHat model. These often overlooked additional features are how a current open source model can replicate the success found in RedHat. Here’s a better look at the RedHat model.

RedHat offers a freely available product; an amazingly good codebase available for anyone to download. Then, in addition to offering support for this product RedHat provides a wide range of additional services offered as add-ons to effectively make things easier for businesses. Note what this does not mean. This does not yield a sub-standard or crippled free open source code. The free source code is every bit as powerful and is the basis on which RedHat builds everything else. Rather than maintaining a separate and “better” product RedHat takes away the pain of compiling and building the finished product. Then they offer support for this product (everyone sticks on this part)…and they offer additional services focused on specific market segments.

This is a brilliant strategy for a number of reasons. This approach still supports and encourages open source completely. This provides anyone and everyone regardless of the size of their business or their revenue the opportunity to use incredibly powerful software. This allows a global community the opportunity to find and improve the software and to implement improvements that meets the goals and needs of the majority. This strategy empowers people. And this strategy also allows a successful business to be built around this product. But this is just the beginning. Structuring things in this way paves the way for other businesses to find success and also be built on this same amazing source code.

RedHat is more than a support company. RedHat is an open source company that empowers people regardless of size. They have turned an industry on its head and revolutionized the way software could be released for free and still be profitable. This strategy, this complete strategy, can be replicated. This is how you can be successful today replicating the RedHat model. Look at the bigger picture. Don’t neglect the community. Don’t cripple the core open source code. Build supporting services to meet specific needs. Empower people.